History Nuggets: Mayflower Pilgrims and home brew

Beer was key…beer was safer to drink than water especially aboard ship. So yes, the Mayflower Pilgrims carried their beer across the Atlantic…

William Bradford mentioned their need for beer when he recalled the day they set out for what would be known as Plymouth:

“So in the morning, after we had called on God for direction, we came to this resolution — to go presently ashore again and to take a better view of the two places which we thought most fitting for us; for we could not now take much time for further search or consideration, our *victuals being much spent, especially our **beer.”

Original source:  William Bradford’s daily journal.

*Victuals – provisions, food

**Out of beer, the Pilgrims were forced to live off water. Beer was viewed as a health drink. It was fairly low on alcohol and didn’t make one sick like the water from many streams and wells in Europe.  Cheers!

Inspirational photo by Pixabay

 

 

History Nuggets: Colorful Pilgrims

Pilgrim men did not wear black breeches, square white-collar and cuffs, wide buckled belts, black steeple hats with a buckle, nor did Pilgrim women wear full black skirts, white aprons and dark capes. Pilgrim adults and children wore bright solid colors since their religion did not object to colorful clothing.

The Pilgrims, in fact, wore a wide variety of colors. We know this because when a person died, an inventory stated their belongings  for the purpose of probate: and the color of garments often appeared.   For example, long-time church member, Mary Ring, died in Plymouth in 1633, and her estate included a “mingled-color” waistcoat, two violet waistcoats, three blue aprons, a red petticoat, a violet petticoat, blue stockings, and white stockings. In addition, she owned gray cloth, blue cloth and red cloth, ready to make additional clothing. Plymouth’s Church Elder William Brewster, who died in 1644, owned green pants, a red cap, a violet coat, and a blue suit. And Governor William Bradford, when he died in 1657, owned a green gown, violet cloak, and a red waistcoat.  Fascinating…

Inspirational photo by Pixabay

History Nugget: Pilgrim Babies

Oceanus Hopkins (1620— c. 1626) was the only child born on the Mayflower during its historic voyage which brought the English Pilgrims to America. A boy, Peregrine White, was born on board, after arriving in America, as the ship lay at anchor.  Thanks be to God.

Inspirational photo by Pixabay

 

Brodie barks about dogs at the First Thanksgiving

We’re beginning to get ready for our Thanksgiving celebration.  Lots to do for humans and tons of things for a golden dog like me to watch while they do it.  The deliciously different smells in the kitchen…the unusual movements…the special serving pieces that make different noises when placed on the table…the real wax candles that smell of spices…the gaiety in the air and the smiles…it’s starting.

Makes my golden mind wonder about those two dogs… an English Mastiff and a Springer Spaniel…that some historians say crossed over the Atlantic in 1620 on The Mayflower and according to journals…attended the first feast shared by the new settlers and the Wampanoag tribe.

So, as we prepare for giving thanks and being grateful, I’m feeling humbled by the sacrifices these people made and the tradition that came as a result of their persistent fortitude.  Watch and listen…

Haiku: Steps

Walk in the foot prints
Know the past through your own steps
Walk through history

Haiku by PamelaWLucas 10/5/17

Inspirational photo taken by Ashley Morgan Lucas at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 9/30/17

The University of Virginia will celebrate its bicentennial of the laying of its cornerstone on October 6, 1817, in a Masonic ritual attended by current and former Presidents Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and James Monroe.

 

 

History tidbit: Presidents and Booze

Shaken not stirred…cheap verses expensive…straight up or on the rocks…abstain or indulge…Presidents had and still have favorites when imbibing.  Brief nugget here on the first 5 presidents and their drink of choice:

George Washington – Dark Porter Beer…even though he distilled whisky and sold it, making huge profits…George was a beer drinker.

John Adams – Hard Cider…liked it so much he had it with breakfast.

Thomas Jefferson – French Wines…expensive ones filled his cellar.

James Madison – Champagne…although the bubbles could give him a headache.

James Monroe – French Red Wine…liked them so much that he ordered 1,200 bottles of French Burgundy and Champagnes…charged them to furnishings for the White House.

More on the favorite adult beverage of each president.

 

 

 

History Tidbits: Rounders and Cricket make baseball?

Baseball came about in 1839 thanks to Abner Doubleday…well…no…seems a bit more complicated.

A game that resembled baseball began in the 18th century…melding together a kid’s game called rounders played by colonial children and the well-known game of cricket.  Variations of this developing  game with no rules could be seen everywhere…particularly in the fast growing industrial cities.  In September 1845, a group of New York City men founded the New York Knickerbocker Baseball Club. 

Doubleday, a graduate of West Point, served during the Civil War and was second in command at Fort Sumter where he ordered the Union’s first shots of the Civil War in response to the bombardment by secessionist forces.  His military service is impressive.

Doubleday still remains in the heart of many as the founder of baseball…but history quashed that story.

History Tidbits: 20th President of US needed a metal detector

Who was the 20th President of the USA?  Hints:

He was the last of the “log cabin” presidents.

His assassin shot him in the back and arm.  He died in 1881 after serving only 200 days as 20th.

His inept doctor was possibly responsible for his death, as history says he could have survived his wounds.

His death helped launch the crude invention of the metal detector by Alexander Graham Bell.

Robert Todd Lincoln, first son of Abraham Lincoln, serving as this president’s Secretary of War was with 20th at the moment the assassin’s bullets struck.

So, who was the 20th?  James A. Garfield

 

History Tidbits: Who opened his mouth to Freedom?

There is always a beginning…a start…in some cases a stick your neck out and go for it moment.

So, let’s celebrate that moment… let’s celebrate the  man who stood up during the Continental Congress on June 7, 1776 in the Pennsylvania State House in Philadelphia, making the motion…calling for the colonies’ independence from Great Britain.

That man was Richard Henry Lee, a brilliant statesman from Virginia who helped create the United States of America.  We all thank you Mr. Lee, for that beginning…that moment in history and for its outcome as a result of the resolve of the great men representing the 13 colonies and their passion for independence.  Happy Fourth of July.

History Tidbits: Fireworks and the second President of the United States

Why do we celebrate the Fourth of July with fireworks?  Well, a big thank you to John Adams who envisioned this glorious day being commemorated “with Pomp and Parade, with Shews, Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other from this Time forward forever more.”

Let freedom ring.