History Tidbits: Rounders and Cricket make baseball?

Baseball came about in 1839 thanks to Abner Doubleday…well…no…seems a bit more complicated.

A game that resembled baseball began in the 18th century…melding together a kid’s game called rounders played by colonial children and the well-known game of cricket.  Variations of this developing  game with no rules could be seen everywhere…particularly in the fast growing industrial cities.  In September 1845, a group of New York City men founded the New York Knickerbocker Baseball Club. 

Doubleday, a graduate of West Point, served during the Civil War and was second in command at Fort Sumter where he ordered the Union’s first shots of the Civil War in response to the bombardment by secessionist forces.  His military service is impressive.

Doubleday still remains in the heart of many as the founder of baseball…but history quashed that story.

History Tidbits: 20th President of US needed a metal detector

Who was the 20th President of the USA?  Hints:

He was the last of the “log cabin” presidents.

His assassin shot him in the back and arm.  He died in 1881 after serving only 200 days as 20th.

His inept doctor was possibly responsible for his death, as history says he could have survived his wounds.

His death helped launch the crude invention of the metal detector by Alexander Graham Bell.

Robert Todd Lincoln, first son of Abraham Lincoln, serving as this president’s Secretary of War was with 20th at the moment the assassin’s bullets struck.

So, who was the 20th?  James A. Garfield

 

History Tidbits: Who opened his mouth to Freedom?

There is always a beginning…a start…in some cases a stick your neck out and go for it moment.

So, let’s celebrate that moment… let’s celebrate the  man who stood up during the Continental Congress on June 7, 1776 in the Pennsylvania State House in Philadelphia, making the motion…calling for the colonies’ independence from Great Britain.

That man was Richard Henry Lee, a brilliant statesman from Virginia who helped create the United States of America.  We all thank you Mr. Lee, for that beginning…that moment in history and for its outcome as a result of the resolve of the great men representing the 13 colonies and their passion for independence.  Happy Fourth of July.

History Tidbits: Fireworks and the second President of the United States

Why do we celebrate the Fourth of July with fireworks?  Well, a big thank you to John Adams who envisioned this glorious day being commemorated “with Pomp and Parade, with Shews, Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other from this Time forward forever more.”

Let freedom ring.

Golden Brodie barks: Amelia, where are you?

Dogs…that’s right…four border collies trained in finding long-buried bones are sniffing out the discovery of a life time…an answer to whatever happened to Amelia Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan?

remote beach in the Pacific
remote beach in the Pacific

Well…the four are searching… wearing booties to protect their paws from 80 degree ground temperatures, hundreds of thousands of coconut crabs and sharp volcanic rock fragments.  Sound like fun?  Yeah, these well-trained dogs are doing their job and going for the find of their dog lives.

These dogs can hunt!  Seriously…hoping they find the remaining bones of Amelia so we can put her to rest in our hearts and minds…that would be a golden moment for all.

History: Paying tribute…D Day, June 4, 1944

“On June 6, 1944, more than 160,000 Allied troops landed along a 50-mile stretch of heavily-fortified French coastline, to fight Nazi Germany on the beaches of Normandy, France.”

Read on to a united front victory.

Remembering those who gave their all for our freedom.

 

History Nugget: Why is there a Memorial Day?

Ever wonder why there is a Memorial Day.  Well, read and thank Mary Logan… a woman who observed, with caring and emotional eyes…first hand the devastation left on the landscape immediately following the Civil War.

Thank you Mary Logan.

 

Credit given for this fine article to Ken Zurski.